As Long as the Rivers Flow

2013 Third Place Burt Award for First Nations, Inuit and Métis Young Adult Literature
Publisher: 
Random House of Canada Ltd.
Pub Date: 
November 2011
Pages: 
244
Fiction
Paperback
ISBN: 
9780307398758
Price: 
$19.95

As Long as the Rivers Flow follows one girl, Martha, from the Cat Lake First Nation in Northern Ontario who is "stolen" from her family at the age of six and flown far away to residential school. Ten long years later, Martha finds her way home again, barely able to speak her native tongue. The memories of abuse at the residential school are so strong that she tries to drown her feelings in drink, and when she gives birth to her beloved son, Spider, he is taken away by Children's Aid to Toronto. In time, she has a baby girl, Raven, whom she decides to leave in the care of her mother while she braves the bewildering strangeness of the big city to find her son and bring him home. 

 

 

"James Bartleman honours the resiliency of the Indigenous spirit, despite the legacies of residential schools. There is truth and hope here. As Long as the Rivers Flow should be mandatory reading for everyone." — Jury, Burt Award for First Nations, Métis and Inuit Literature 

“As Long as the Rivers Flow casts an unflinching eye on the self-destruction that often befalls residential school survivors and their children. . . . Impressive.” — Quill & Quire

The Globe and Mail

Currently no resources or Ebooks listed

As Long as the Rivers Flow follows one girl, Martha, from the Cat Lake First Nation in Northern Ontario who is "stolen" from her family at the age of six and flown far away to residential school. Ten long years later, Martha finds her way home again, barely able to speak her native tongue. The memories of abuse at the residential school are so strong that she tries to drown her feelings in drink, and when she gives birth to her beloved son, Spider, he is taken away by Children's Aid to Toronto. In time, she has a baby girl, Raven, whom she decides to leave in the care of her mother while she braves the bewildering strangeness of the big city to find her son and bring him home. 

 

 

"James Bartleman honours the resiliency of the Indigenous spirit, despite the legacies of residential schools. There is truth and hope here. As Long as the Rivers Flow should be mandatory reading for everyone." — Jury, Burt Award for First Nations, Métis and Inuit Literature 

“As Long as the Rivers Flow casts an unflinching eye on the self-destruction that often befalls residential school survivors and their children. . . . Impressive.” — Quill & Quire

The Globe and Mail

Currently no resources or Ebooks listed